What is the GMAT?

If you’re one of the thousands of students who plan on applying to graduate business programs in the United States, you probably have standardized testing at the top of your application to-do list. While most US graduate programs require you to submit GRE scores, when it comes to MBA programs, the GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test) is by far the most popular and widely-accepted standardized test.

In this comprehensive guide, we’ll cover everything you need to know about the GMAT, including test content, scoring methods, percentiles, and most importantly, a sample GMAT study plan that will guide you in your GMAT preparation so you can earn the score that will get you into a top-tier business program. There’s a lot to cover, so let’s get started!

 

So, What Is the GMAT, Really?

At its most basic, the GMAT is a computer-based standardized test designed to evaluate certain skills associated with success in graduate business programs. While many of the skills evaluated on the GMAT are similar to those evaluated by other standardized tests, like the GRE, the content of the GMAT is specifically geared toward business outcomes and aptitude.

Who Makes the GMAT Test?

The organization that makes and distributes the GMAT is the similarly-named GMAC (Graduate Management Admission Council). GMAC is a global non-profit that offers services to educational institutions and prospective graduate students in business fields. GMAC developed the GMAT exam in 1953 as a way of providing a universal standardized assessment for incoming MBA applicants. While the GRE is being accepted by more and more business programs throughout the country, the GMAT still remains the industry standard.

What Is the GMAT Used For?

As we’ve already mentioned, the GMAT is a standardized test that is designed to evaluate prospective students’ skills and aptitude in certain fields appropriate to the business world. The GMAT assesses skills in the following categories:

  • Verbal Reasoning
  • Quantitative Reasoning
  • Integrated Reasoning
  • Analytical Writing in English

We’ll go over these categories and their methods of assessment in much greater detail later in this article.

Who Takes the GMAT?

The following chart offers some basic demographic information on GMAT test-takers.

gmattesttakers

How Much Does it Cost to Take the GMAT Exam?

Unlike some other standardized tests, the GMAT costs the same to take no matter where in the world you will be taking it: $250. You can register online, by mail , or by phone, and GMAC accepts Visa, MasterCard, JCB, or American Express.

GMAT Basic Information

gmattest

Before we get into the content-specific sections, let’s take a broad overview of the GMAT exam as a whole. We’ll look at testing dates, locations, registration processes, costs, and other useful information as you’re just getting started with the GMAT.

When Is the GMAT Offered?

The GMAT is offered on a per-registration basis, meaning there are no predetermined dates when the GMAT is administered. Rather, it is offered just about every day of the year. This is great news, because it allows you to select a date and time that works best for you, your GMAT preparation schedule, and your business school plans.

Further, you can register for the GMAT as early as six months ahead of time or as late as 24 hours before the scheduled test day. But in order to ensure you get the test date that works best for you, it’s a good idea to register for the GMAT at least a couple of months in advance.

Where to Take the GMAT Test

There are specifically designated testing centers throughout the world that offer GMAT testing. Head over to GMAT’s “Choose a Test Center” page to find the testing location most convenient for you.

How Long Does the GMAT Take?

GMAT Duration: 3 hours, 30 minutes
Check-In 10 min.
Analytical Writing Assessment 1 Argument Essay 30 min.
Integrated Reasoning 12 Questions 30 min.
Optional Break 8 min.
Quantitative Reasoning 31 Questions 62 min.
Optional Break 5 min.
Verbal Reasoning 36 Questions 65 min.

GMAT vs. GRE

Which Test Is Better for Your Business School Goals: GMAT or GRE?

business school

The most important thing to consider when deciding between these two exams is whether the school or schools you intend to apply to accept one, the other, or both. While most business programs accept the GMAT, not all accept the GRE.

The other thing to keep in mind is what your strengths are. Why? Because the level of difficulty in different sections of each exam can be quite different. For instance, it’s generally accepted that the quantitative reasoning section on the GMAT is considerably more challenging than that of the GRE. On the other hand, if you’re not as confident in your writing abilities, the GMAT might be more suitable for you. Though the difficulty of the writing sections for the two exams is similar, the GMAT only requires one 30-minute essay, as opposed to the two 30-minute essays for the GRE. Further, most agree that the GRE’s verbal reasoning section is a bit tougher than the one on the GMAT.

All this said, when deciding between the two exams, it’s important to keep your educational and career goals in mind and do the research on which exam will best help you achieve those ends.

What Does the GMAT Evaluate?

Each of the four GMAT sections evaluates a different set of skills that are invaluable to your success in a graduate business program and in the business world more generally. Here, we’ll go over each of the four sections in some greater detail to cover what exactly each section evaluates and how it does that evaluation. We’ll consider content, question types, and even offer some sample questions for each section.

Analytical Writing Section

The GMAT’s Analytical Writing section will require you to write a single argumentative essay that evaluates and responds to a given argument. The topic will likely be business-related, but knowledge and familiarity with the topic is not required, and you will not be evaluated on your knowledge of the topic. Instead, this section assesses your ability to understand and analyze an argument, and then to compose a fully developed, thoughtful, and clearly-reasoned essay.

It is important to note, though, that the GMAT Analytical Writing score is not considered as part of your overall GMAT score (same with the integrated reasoning section). That said, your Analytical Writing score will be included in the score report sent to your prospective programs, so it’s still an important part of the exam, and you should take it seriously. You never know how much stock admissions committees might put in this section.

Analytical Writing Section
Time 30 minutes
Tasks 1 essay – analyze an argument’s reasoning and critique it.
Score Range 0 – 6
Sample Question

The following appeared in a speech delivered by a member of the city council: “Twenty years ago, only half of the students who graduated from Einstein High School went on to attend a college or university. Today, two–thirds of the students who graduate from Einstein do so. Clearly, Einstein has improved its educational effectiveness over the past two decades. This improvement has occurred despite the fact that the school’s funding, when adjusted for inflation, is about the same as it was 20 years ago. Therefore, we do not need to make any substantial increase in the school’s funding at this time.”

Discuss how well reasoned you find this argument. In your discussion be sure to analyze the line of reasoning and the use of evidence in the argument. For example, you may need to consider what questionable assumptions underlie the thinking and what alternative explanations or counterexamples might weaken the conclusion. You can also discuss what sort of evidence would strengthen or refute the argument, what changes in the argument would make it more logically sound, and what, if anything, would help you better evaluate its conclusion

Evaluation Criteria
  • Organization of ideas
  • Syntactic variety
  • Topical analysis
  • How well you
    • Identify/analyze key aspects of argument
    • Develop, structure, express your thoughts
    • Offer relevant reasoning and examples
    • Write in standard English

Integrated Reasoning Section

The GMAT Integrated Reasoning section is one of the more unique aspects of the test, as compared to other graduate aptitude tests like the GRE. The purpose of this section is to evaluate your skill at using data to address complex issues. The following chart offers specifics on the types of questions you’ll encounter, what they specifically assess, and other useful information.

GMAT Integrated Reasoning
Time 30 min.
Questions 12
Score Range 1 – 8
Question Type Multi-Source Reasoning Table Analysis Graphics Interpretation Two-Part Analysis
Skills Assessed
  • Examine data from multiple textual sources, tables, graphics
  • Analyze sources to answer different questions
  • Identify discrepancies between data sets
  • Draw inferences
  • Determine relevance
  • Sort and analyze data in a table
  • Determine what data is relevant or meets certain conditions
  • Interpret information in a graph or other graphic (scatter plot, x/y graph, bar, pie, curve, etc.)
  • Discern relationships
  • Make inferences
  • Solve complex problems (quantitative, verbal, a combination of both)
  • Evaluate trade-offs
  • Solve simultaneous equations
  • Discern relationships
Sample Questions See the GMAC site for sample questions. See the GMAC site for sample questions. See the GMAC site for sample questions. See the GMAC site for sample questions.
GMAT Integrated Reasoning
Time 30 min.
Questions 12
Score Range 1 – 8
Question Type: Multi-Source Reasoning

Skills Assessed:

  • Examine data from multiple textual sources, tables, graphics
  • Analyze sources to answer different questions
  • Identify discrepancies between data sets
  • Draw inferences
  • Determine relevance
Sample Questions: See the GMAC site for sample questions.
Question Type: Table Analysis

Skills Assessed:

  • Sort and analyze data in a table
  • Determine what data is relevant or meets certain conditions
Sample Questions: See the GMAC site for sample questions.
Question Type: Graphics Interpretation

Skills Assessed:

  • Interpret information in a graph or other graphic (scatter plot, x/y graph, bar, pie, curve, etc.)
  • Discern relationships
  • Make inferences
Sample Questions: See the GMAC site for sample questions.
Question Type: Two-Part Analysis

Skills Assessed:

  • Solve complex problems (quantitative, verbal, a combination of both)
  • Evaluate trade-offs
  • Solve simultaneous equations
  • Discern relationships
Sample Questions: See the GMAC site for sample questions.

Verbal Reasoning Section

The GMAT Verbal Reasoning section assesses your skills and abilities with three major types of questions, all of which are multiple-choice: Critical Reasoning, Sentence Correction, and Reading Comprehension.

GMAT Verbal Reasoning
Time 65 min.
Questions 36
Score Range 6 – 60
Question Type Reading Comprehension Critical Reasoning Sentence Correction
Skills Assessed
  • Understand words and statements
  • Understand logical relationships between main points
  • Infer
  • Follow development of quantitative ideas
  • Interpret material
  • Apply information to a further context
  • Make arguments
  • Evaluate arguments
  • Formulate/evaluate a plan of action
  • Correct expression
    • Grammatical and structural soundness of sentences
  • Effective expression
    • Expressing ideas and relationships clearly, concisely, and correctly (grammar)
Sample Questions See the GMAC site for sample questions. See the GMAC site for sample questions. See the GMAC site for sample questions.
GMAT Verbal Reasoning
Time 65 min.
Questions 36
Score Range 6 – 60
Question Type: Reading Comprehension

Skills Assessed:

  • Understand words and statements
  • Understand logical relationships between main points
  • Infer
  • Follow development of quantitative ideas
  • Interpret material
  • Apply information to a further context

Sample Questions

See the GMAC site for sample questions.

Question Type: Critical Reasoning

Skills Assessed:

  • Make arguments
  • Evaluate arguments
  • Formulate/evaluate a plan of action

Sample Questions

See the GMAC site for sample questions.

Question Type: Sentence Correction

Skills Assessed:

  • Correct expression
    • Grammatical and structural soundness of sentences
  • Effective expression
    • Expressing ideas and relationships clearly, concisely, and correctly (grammar)

Sample Questions

See the GMAC site for sample questions.

Quantitative Reasoning Section

Simply put, the GMAT Quantitative Reasoning section evaluates your overall mathematical skills. There are two types of questions that you’ll encounter on this section: Problem Solving and Data Sufficiency. Let’s take a closer look at what this section assesses in this chart.

GMAT Quantitative Reasoning
Time 62 min.
Questions 31
Score Range 6 – 60
Question Type Problem Solving Data Sufficiency
Skills Assessed
  • Logical and analytical reasoning for solving quantitative problems
  • Analyze quantitative problems
  • Recognize relevant data
  • Determine when you have sufficient data to solve a problem
Sample Questions

  1. u > s
  2. s > q
  3. u > r
  • (A) I only
  • (B) II only
  • (C) III only
  • (D) I and II
  • (E) II and III

 

  • (1) The selling price minus the real estate agent’s commission was $84,600.
  • (2) The selling price was 250 percent of the original purchase price of $36,000.
  • (A) Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient.
  • (B) Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient.
  • (C) BOTH statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient
  • (D) EACH statement ALONE is sufficient.
  • (E) Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient.
GMAT Verbal Reasoning
Time 65 min.
Questions 36
Score Range 6 – 60
Question Type: Reading Comprehension

Skills Assessed

  • Understand words and statements
  • Understand logical relationships between main points
  • Infer
  • Follow development of quantitative ideas
  • Interpret material
  • Apply information to a further context

Sample Questions

See the GMAC site for sample questions.

Question Type: Critical Reasoning

Skills Assessed

  • Make arguments
  • Evaluate arguments
  • Formulate/evaluate a plan of action

Sample Questions

See the GMAC site for sample questions.

DELETE
Question Type: Sentence Correction

Skills Assessed

  • Correct expression
    • Grammatical and structural soundness of sentences
  • Effective expression
    • Expressing ideas and relationships clearly, concisely, and correctly (grammar)

Sample Questions

See the GMAC site for sample questions.

How Is the GMAT Scored?

gmat score

In this section, we’ll cover the basics of how GMAC scores your GMAT exam, including separate scores for quantitative, verbal, integrated, and analytical writing sections.

How Is Your GMAT Score Calculated? – Adaptive Scoring

We’ve already covered the basic scoring scales for each section, so we’ll now focus on an aspect of GMAT scoring that tends to confuse test-takers: how does GMAT adaptive scoring work?

All “adaptive scoring” means is that the difficulty of the questions will automatically adapt to your performance thus far in the exam. That is, if you are getting a lot of questions correct, then the ensuing questions will be more difficult, and if you are getting a lot incorrect, the ensuing questions will be less challenging. But what does this mean for scoring?

While we don’t have access to the official scoring algorithm used to score GMAT exams, we do know that you certainly won’t be penalized for getting a lot of questions correct at first, and then getting fewer correct as the questions adapt to become more difficult. That is, harder questions will be “worth” more when you get them right, and count against you less when you get them wrong.

What Is a Good GMAT Score?

Determining what a “good” GMAT score is depends on a number of student-specific variables, so it’s really impossible to give a direct answer. To find out what a good GMAT score is for you, consider the following questions:

  • What is the minimum GMAT score required for admission to the program(s) you will be applying to?
  • What is the average GMAT score for students who are actually admitted to the program(s)?
  • What are your personal goals when it comes to GMAT scores? Is there a certain percentile you’d like to reach?
  • Does the program you want to attend accept GRE scores? Are your GRE scores better or worse than your GMAT scores? Which test do you think you can perform better on?

Once you’ve come up with some answers to those questions, you might take a look below at the following GMAT percentile charts. While we don’t recommend judging yourself too harshly based on these scores of all GMAT-takers, the percentiles can be a useful metric to help you gauge where you are at in relation to all other students who took the exam. Remember, a percentile doesn’t show you the percentage of correctly-answered questions, or anything like that. Instead, the percentile for a given score shows how many other test takers scored below that listed score. So, for example, if you received an overall GMAT score of 650, that means you scored in the 73rd percentile–that is, you scored higher than 73% of all other test takers.

Overall GMAT Score Percentiles

GMAT Score % Below
800 99
750 98
700 88
650 73
550 56
500 39
450 27
400 17
350 10
300 6
250 3
200 2

Integrated Reasoning Percentile

GMAT Score % Below
8 92
7 82
6 70
5 54
4 38
3 24
2 11
1 0
 

Verbal Reasoning Percentile

GMAT Score % Below
51 99
46 99
40 90
35 76
30 58
25 39
20 23
15 10
10 3
 

Quantitative Reasoning Percentile

GMAT Score % Below
51 96
46 58
41 41
36 29
31 18
26 12
21 6
16 3
11 2
6 0
 

Analytical Writing Percentile

GMAT Score % Below
6.0 88
5.5 79
5.0 53
4.5 42
4.0 17
3.5 11
3.0 4
2.5 3
2.0 2
1.5-0.0 1
 

Preparing for the GMAT

planning

Now that you have a better understanding of the kinds of content on the GMAT, as well as all the important details about the exam structure and duration, you’re probably wondering: what is the best way to prepare for the GMAT exam?

In this section, we’ll provide the best advice on effective GMAT preparation, when to take the GMAT, and a GMAT study plan outline that you can adapt to your own GMAT prep needs.

When Should You Take the GMAT?

There’s no single answer to this question for every GMAT test taker. The reason for this is that the best time to take the GMAT is when you are ready. That is, once you’ve done some diagnostic practice tests and determined your areas of strength and weakness, you’ll have a much better idea of when you should take the exam. The bottom line is that you shouldn’t jump into taking the GMAT until you are confident that you’re prepared to earn a score that adequately reflects your potential as a business grad student. Don’t rush this process in an effort to fast track your business school goals. You’ll be much better off taking the time to prepare to ensure you can get the best score you are capable of.

How Do Successful GMAT Takers Prepare for the Test?

The best way to plan out your GMAT preparation is clearly to model it on the methods used by those who have had the most success with the GMAT. The following simple tips come from extensive research and suggestions from high-achieving test-takers.

  • Get acquainted with the test format and content areas
  • Take lots of GMAT practice exams
  • Make a GMAT study plan (like the one we outline below!)
  • Assess your strengths and weaknesses (another great use for GMAT practice exams)
  • Online prep courses are among the best ways to study for the GMAT, as they offer guided instruction, as well as plenty of practice tests
  • Use reputable GMAT prep books
  • If you can afford it, consider a private GMAT tutor or an in-person prep course

GMAT Study Plan: Timeline and Materials

Though your plan will necessarily look quite different from the one we’ve provided here, this broad outline can give you a starting point from which to create your own plan. The first month outlined below is a great way to start your GMAT exam prep, as it focuses on self-assessment and getting a better idea of the kinds of things you’ll encounter on the exam, as well as some helpful resources on how to get your GMAT prep started off right.

First Month: Self-Assessment and Getting Acquainted with the GMAT

Tasks Goals and Outcomes Helpful Resources
Week 1
  • Take a GMAT practice test before you do any studying (preferably, before you’ve even familiarized yourself with the exam). It’s crucial that you mimic the testing conditions as closely as possible.
Get some initial exposure to the exam structure, content, and procedures.

Use one of the two free GMAT practice tests offered here

This should be your first source of practice GMAT exams, as they come straight from GMAC, the creators of the GMAT.

  • Assess your results, paying special attention to broad areas and sections that you didn’t do very well on.
Identify general content areas of strength and weakness. Use the percentile charts above to assess your scores.
  • Assess your experience.
    How did it make you feel?
    Did you experience any anxiety?
    How did you respond to the time constraints?
Gain useful insight into how you perform under pressure and determine if you need to improve your general test-taking strategies. If you experienced considerable anxiety, check out this great resource on how to work on mitigating it.
  • Record your scores and any notes on your results and experiences gleaned from your reflections.
Start a GMAT prep diary to track your progress over time, which will allow you to better focus and adapt your study plan as you go.

Consider using a basic notebook to record your progress. 

If you want to get a bit more advanced, look into journaling apps like Day One, Grid Diary, or Journey

Week 2
  • Familiarize yourself with all aspects of the GMAT.
This process should acquaint you with the format, structure, time limits, question types, and other details of the exam. The whole point here is to demystify the GMAT and give you a foundation on which to build your GMAT study plan in the next week.

The obvious place to start is the official MBA website of GMAC, the organization that makes the GMAT. Spend some real time going through all of the pages to get the most out of the information offered straight from the horse’s mouth. There is a surprising amount of useful information there. 

Further, there’s tons of great information on GMAC’s main site.

But there are plenty of other great sources of information out there, like our site here or other great test prep sites like Crush the GRE and here at GRE Guru!

Week 3
  • Put together a detailed, focused GMAT study plan.
This one’s pretty obvious. You have to establish a well-structured plan to ensure you’re focusing your GMAT prep on the right topics, skills and content areas, as well as a means of holding yourself accountable. 

We recommend using a basic paper planner with lots of room for writing detailed instructions.

However, you can also digitize your GMAT study plan with a calendar or planner app like Things, Fantastical, or free options from Google or Apple. 

  • Compare, Select, and Purchase your primary GMAT study materials.
Whether you choose to use an online GMAT prep course, GMAT prep books, or both, now’s the time to decide which will be best for your study needs.

To help you decide, here are our hand-picked lists of GMAT prep tools:

Week 4
  • Take another practice GMAT and record your results and experience as before.

See if your score improved at all simply from being more familiar with the test.

 

For a better reflection of where you are at the start of your GMAT prep, use the average of your two practice test scores as your starting score, and compare future practice test scores to it.

Use your second free practice GMAT from the GMAC site.

First Month: Self-Assessment and Getting Acquainted with the GMAT

Week 1
  • Take a GMAT practice test before you do any studying (preferably, before you’ve even familiarized yourself with the exam). It’s crucial that you mimic the testing conditions as closely as possible.
Goals and Outcomes: Get some initial exposure to the exam structure, content, and procedures.

Helpful Resources: Use one of the two free GMAT practice tests offered here

This should be your first source of practice GMAT exams, as they come straight from GMAC, the creators of the GMAT.

  • Assess your results, paying special attention to broad areas and sections that you didn’t do very well on.
Goals and Outcomes: Identify general content areas of strength and weakness.
Helpful Resources: Use the percentile charts above to assess your scores.
  • Assess your experience.
    How did it make you feel?
    Did you experience any anxiety?
    How did you respond to the time constraints?
Goals and Outcomes: Gain useful insight into how you perform under pressure and determine if you need to improve your general test-taking strategies.
Helpful Resources: If you experienced considerable anxiety, check out this great resource on how to work on mitigating it.
  • Record your scores and any notes on your results and experiences gleaned from your reflections.
Goals and Outcomes: Start a GMAT prep diary to track your progress over time, which will allow you to better focus and adapt your study plan as you go.

Helpful Resources: Consider using a basic notebook to record your progress. 

If you want to get a bit more advanced, look into journaling apps like Day One, Grid Diary, or Journey

Week 2
  • Familiarize yourself with all aspects of the GMAT.
Goals and Outcomes: This process should acquaint you with the format, structure, time limits, question types, and other details of the exam. The whole point here is to demystify the GMAT and give you a foundation on which to build your GMAT study plan in the next week.

Helpful Resources: The obvious place to start is the official MBA website of GMAC, the organization that makes the GMAT. Spend some real time going through all of the pages to get the most out of the information offered straight from the horse’s mouth. There is a surprising amount of useful information there. 

Further, there’s tons of great information on GMAC’s main site.

But there are plenty of other great sources of information out there, like our site here or other great test prep sites like Crush the GRE and here at GRE Guru!

Week 3
  • Put together a detailed, focused GMAT study plan.
Goals and Outcomes: This one’s pretty obvious. You have to establish a well-structured plan to ensure you’re focusing your GMAT prep on the right topics, skills and content areas, as well as a means of holding yourself accountable. 

Helpful Resources: We recommend using a basic paper planner with lots of room for writing detailed instructions.

However, you can also digitize your GMAT study plan with a calendar or planner app like Things, Fantastical, or free options from Google or Apple. 

  • Compare, Select, and Purchase your primary GMAT study materials.
Goals and Outcomes: Whether you choose to use an online GMAT prep course, GMAT prep books, or both, now’s the time to decide which will be best for your study needs.

Helpful Resources: To help you decide, here are our hand-picked lists of GMAT prep tools:

Week 4
  • Take another practice GMAT and record your results and experience as before.

Goals and Outcomes: See if your score improved at all simply from being more familiar with the test.

For a better reflection of where you are at the start of your GMAT prep, use the average of your two practice test scores as your starting score, and compare future practice test scores to it.

Helpful Resources: Use your second free practice GMAT from the GMAC site.

Second Month: The Real Preparation Begins!

Tasks
Week 1
  • Spend at least 1.5 hours each day reviewing materials for the content area you most need to improve in, your “primary content area” (quantitative, verbal, or integrated reasoning).
  • Spend at least 1 hour each day reviewing materials for your secondary content area (quantitative, verbal, or integrated reasoning).
  • Spend at least 30 minutes each day reviewing materials for your tertiary (third most important) content area (quantitative, verbal, or integrated reasoning).
Week 2
  • Repeat all tasks from Week 1.
  • Take a complete GMAT Practice Exam.
  • Evaluate your scores, reflect on your experience, and record your results and insights in your GMAT study diary.
Week 3
  • Repeat all tasks from Week 1.
Week 4
  • Repeat all tasks from Week 2.
  • Adjust your GMAT study plan according to your practice test results, as necessary.

Third Month: Intensive Content Review and Test-Taking Strategy

Tasks Helpful Resources
Week 1
  • Spend at least 2 hours each day reviewing materials in your primary content area.
This is a good time to drill deep with your prefered GMAT prep tools. You may even want to begin supplementing your initial prep tools with other resources, like flashcards, apps, etc.
  • Spend at least 1.5 hours each day reviewing materials in your secondary content area.
  • Spend at least 45 minutes each day reviewing materials in your tertiary content area.
  1. Spend at least 30 minutes each day reviewing possible analytical writing prompts
Full list of Analytical Writing prompts can be found here. 
  • Spend at least 30 minutes each day reviewing GMAT testing strategies.
The web has tons of great advice on test-taking strategies for the GMAT. One particularly useful resource is offered by GMAC itself. 
  • Take a complete GMAT Practice Exam.
  • Evaluate your scores, reflect on your experience, and record your results and insights in your GMAT study diary.
  • Adjust your study plan according to your practice test results, as necessary.
Week 2
  • Repeat all tasks from Week 1.
Week 3
  • Repeat all tasks from Week 1.
Week 4
  • Repeat all tasks from Week 1.

Week before the Test: Assess Your Progress and RELAX!

Now that you’ve had several months’ worth of intensive study, the best thing you can do in the days leading up to your exam date is to take some time and relax. Find something you love to do and spend time with those you love who will be supportive of you. This might not seem like the best way to prepare for an exam, but remember, you’ve already done all the hard work with your GMAT preparation–cramming at this stage in the game isn’t going to help much. However, clearing your mind and getting in a positive headspace can do wonders for your confidence and your test-day performance.

 

Good luck!

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